Windy City Media Group Frontpage News
Celebrating 30 Years of Gay Lesbian Bisexual and Trans News
home search facebook twitter join
Gay News Sponsor Windy City Times 2017-12-13
DOWNLOAD ISSUE
About WCMG Publications News Index  Entertainment Features Bars & Clubs Calendar Videos Advertisers OUT! Guide    Marriage

Sponsor
Sponsor

  WINDY CITY TIMES

HUD claims decline in homeless count for 2017
From a press release
2017-12-06

facebook twitter google +1 reddit email


CHICAGO — Homelessness declined in Illinois according to the latest national estimate by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development ( HUD ). While overall homelessness increased by 0.7% nationally since 2016, since 2010 there was a decline of 13.1%. HUD's 2017 Annual Homeless Assessment Report to Congress found the follow regarding homelessness across Illinois:

— In Illinois, local communities reported that 10,798 persons experienced homelessness on a single night in 2017, a decrease of 6.8 percent ( or 792 persons ) since last year and a decrease of 25 percent ( or 3,597 ) since 2010. Homelessness among families with children decreased by 15.2 percent ( or 700 ) across the state since 2016. Since 2010 homeless people in families decreased by 42.8 percent ( 2,923 ).

— Meanwhile, local communities in Illinois report the number of persons experiencing long-term chronic homelessness increased by 44 percent ( or 451 individuals ) and homeless Veterans decreased by 85 or 9% since 2016.

In response to HUD releasing its annual Point-in-Time count announcing that homelessness has increased nationally for the first time since 2010, and although Chicago Coalition for the Homeless ( CCH ) does not doubt that homelessness on the rise, CCH Director of Policy Julie Dworkin said "we have always had serious concerns about the validity of the Point-in-Time count as an accurate reflection of trends in homelessness from year to year.

"The National Law Center on Homelessness & Poverty echoes these concerns in a report, also released today, "Don't Count On It: How the HUD Point-In-Time Count Underestimates the Homelessness Crisis in America." www.nlchp.org/documents/HUD-PIT-report2017 Among concerns cited in the report are the fact that one-night counts do not capture the transitory nature of homelessness, that people sleeping outside are often hidden from plain view, and that the Point-in-Time does not count people who are doubled-up with relatives or friends, or staying in jails or hospitals on the night of the count."

CCH completed its own estimate of homelessnsss in Chicago this year using census data that addresses many of the concerns in the report. It is an annual count, it uses extrapolation techniques to capture people that are not directly counted, and it includes doubled-up households not in the shelter system. An updated CCH count will be released early next year.

"In addition to general concerns about the Point-in-Time methodology, CCH is particularly concerned about HUD's reporting that homelessness decreased by 6.8% in Illinois," Dworkin said. "Illinois' shelter system was decimated by two years without state funding. Numerous surveys of homeless service providers found that significant cutbacks in staff forced agencies to reduce services and reduce how many people they could serve. Since the Point-in-Time relies largely on a count of those staying in shelters, this reduction in services must be accounted for when analyzing the results of the count. Until HUD recognizes the flaws in its Point-in-Time count, we will continue to struggle to have an accurate count of those experiencing homelessness nationwide."

"In many high-cost areas of our country, especially along the West Coast, the severe shortage of affordable housing is manifesting itself on our streets," said HUD Secretary Ben Carson. "With rents rising faster than incomes, we need to bring everybody to the table to produce more affordable housing and ease the pressure that is forcing too many of our neighbors into our shelters and onto our streets. This is not a federal problem—it's everybody's problem."

"All individuals deserve to have a safe and decent place to call home," said Deputy Regional Administrator James A. Cunningham. "While we have made significant strides in reducing the number of individuals experiencing homelessness, we must remain committed to implementing strategies that make it a rare, brief and non-recurring event."

HUD's national estimate is based upon data reported by approximately 3,000 cities and counties across the nation. Every year on a single night in January, planning agencies called 'Continuums of Care" and tens of thousands of volunteers seek to identify the number of individuals and families living in emergency shelters, transitional housing programs and in unsheltered settings. These one-night 'snapshot' counts, as well as full-year counts and data from other sources ( U.S. Housing Survey, Department of Education ), are crucial in understanding the scope of homelessness and measuring progress toward reducing it.

Key National Findings of HUD's 2017 Annual Homeless Assessment Report:

On a single night in January 2017, state and local planning agencies ( Continuums of Care ) in Illinois reported:

- 10,798 people were homeless representing an overall decrease of 792 individuals or 6.8 percent from 2016 and a 25 percent decrease since 2010.

- Most homeless persons, 8,541 ( or 79.1% ), were located in emergency shelters or transitional housing programs while total 2,257 ( or 26.4% ), persons were unsheltered.

- The number of unsheltered homeless individuals in 2017 ( 2,135 ) increased by 21.3 percent from 2016 and by 18.5 percent since 2010.

- The number of families with children experiencing homelessness in 2017 ( 3,904 ), decreased by 15.2 percent ( or 700 persons ) since 2016 and decreased by 42.8 percent ( 2,923 ) since 2010.

- On a single night in January 2017, 864 veterans were experiencing homelessness. Veteran homelessness decreased 9 percent ( or 85 persons ) since January 2016. Since 2010, however, veteran homelessness in Illinois declined by 23.7 percent and by nearly 46% nationally.

- Chronic or long-term homelessness among individuals increased 44.6 percent ( or 418 persons ) over 2016 levels and declined by 36.4 percent since 2010.

- The number of unaccompanied homeless youth and children in 2017 is estimated to be 730 youth. This year, HUD and local communities launched a more intense effort to more accurately account for this important, difficult to count population. HUD will treat 2017 as a baseline year for purposes of tracking progress toward reducing youth homelessness.


facebook twitter google +1 reddit email




Windy City Media Group does not approve or necessarily agree with the views posted below.
Please do not post letters to the editor here. Please also be civil in your dialogue.
If you need to be mean, just know that the longer you stay on this page, the more you help us.


  ARTICLES YOU MIGHT LIKE

Gay News

After grant cuts, director to leave Safe Schools Alliance 2017-12-17 - At the beginning of December, Illinois Safe Schools Alliance announced two significant pieces of news: Following cuts in a State of Illinois grant, ...


Gay News

'Don't Give Up' is Maggie Szabo's song dedicated to transgender youth 2017-12-15 - Maggie Szabo is a Canadian singer-songwriter who has been winning over audiences worldwide with her stunningly soulful vocals and empowering pop anthems. Hailing ...


Gay News

Trans student talks fight to secure locker-room access 2017-12-12 - A transgender suburban teenager recently filed a lawsuit against her high school's district to ensure equitable access to public accommodations, even though the ...


Gay News

HRC to honor trans trailblazer Grimm at conference on LGBTQ youth safety and inclusion 2017-12-12 - WASHINGTON — Today, the Human Rights Campaign Foundation ( HRC ) announced that it will honor transgender advocate Gavin Grimm with an Upstander ...


Gay News

Vogue for Tots at Berlin Nightclub 2017-12-11 - Chicago - Stardust collective announces the 11th Annual Vogue for Tots at Berlin Nightclub, 954 W. Belmont, on Thursday, Dec. 14, 10 p.m.-4 ...


Gay News

Unfair treatment of trans students again challenged in High School District 211 2017-11-30 - CHICAGO — A Palatine High School student today asked a court to force a suburban Chicago school district to comply with state law ...


Gay News

Equality Illinois to honor transgender youth activist Jazz Jennings at 2018 gala 2017-11-30 - CHICAGO—For her activism on behalf of her fellow transgender youth, Jazz Jennings will be honored at the 2018 Equality Illinois Gala as the ...


Gay News

Symposium to address criminalization of girls, LGBTQ/NIA youth in Cook County 2017-11-30 - CHICAGO 11/28/17- Gender & Justice is a groundbreaking and timely symposium that will address advocacy and community solutions centering the experiences of justice-involved ...


Gay News

Back 2 School aiding underserved students 2017-11-29 - Back 2 School Illinois ( B2SI )—a Chicago-based nonprofit that provides tens of thousands of kids from low-income families with free school supplies ...


Gay News

Illinois campaign seeks funds for supplies to help underserved students achieve 2017-11-29 - CHICAGO — Back 2 School Illinois ( B2SI ), a Chicago-based nonprofit that provides tens of thousands of deserving kids from low-income families ...


 



Copyright © 2017 Windy City Media Group. All rights reserved.
Reprint by permission only. PDFs for back issues are downloadable from
our online archives. Single copies of back issues in print form are
available for $4 per issue, older than one month for $6 if available,
by check to the mailing address listed below.

Return postage must accompany all manuscripts, drawings, and
photographs submitted if they are to be returned, and no
responsibility may be assumed for unsolicited materials.
All rights to letters, art and photos sent to Nightspots
(Chicago GLBT Nightlife News) and Windy City Times (a Chicago
Gay and Lesbian News and Feature Publication) will be treated
as unconditionally assigned for publication purposes and as such,
subject to editing and comment. The opinions expressed by the
columnists, cartoonists, letter writers, and commentators are
their own and do not necessarily reflect the position of Nightspots
(Chicago GLBT Nightlife News) and Windy City Times (a Chicago Gay,
Lesbian, Bisexual and Transegender News and Feature Publication).

The appearance of a name, image or photo of a person or group in
Nightspots (Chicago GLBT Nightlife News) and Windy City Times
(a Chicago Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender News and Feature
Publication) does not indicate the sexual orientation of such
individuals or groups. While we encourage readers to support the
advertisers who make this newspaper possible, Nightspots (Chicago
GLBT Nightlife News) and Windy City Times (a Chicago Gay, Lesbian
News and Feature Publication) cannot accept responsibility for
any advertising claims or promotions.

 

 

 

TRENDINGBREAKINGPHOTOS

Sponsor
Sponsor
Sponsor


 



Sponsor

About WCMG Publications News Index  Entertainment Features Bars & Clubs Calendar Videos Advertisers OUT! Guide    Marriage


About WCMG      Contact Us      Online Front  Page      Windy City  Times      Nightspots      OUT! Guide     
Identity      BLACKlines      En La Vida      Archives      Subscriptions      Distribution      Windy City Queercast     
Queercast Archives      Advertising  Rates      Deadlines      Advanced Search     
Press  Releases      Event Photos      Join WCMG  Email List      Email Blast     
Upcoming Events      Todays Events      Ongoing Events      Post an Event      Bar Guide      Community Groups      In Memoriam      Outguide Categories      Outguide Advertisers      Search Outguide      Travel      Dining Out      Blogs      Spotlight  Video     
Classifieds      Real Estate      Place a  Classified     

Windy City Media Group produces Windy City Queercast, & publishes Windy City Times,
The Weekly Voice of the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Trans Community,
Nightspots, Out! Resource Guide, and Identity.
5315 N. Clark St. #192, Chicago, IL 60640-2113 • PH (773) 871-7610 • FAX (773) 871-7609.